Borax

BORAX

According to Wikipedia® : “Borax has a wide variety of uses. It is a component of many detergents, cosmetics, and enamel glazes. It is also used to make buffer solutions in biochemistry, as a fire retardant, as an anti-fungal compound for fiberglass, as an insecticide, as a flux in metallurgy, a texturing agent in cooking, and as a precursor for other boron compounds.”

 Hannah L. Scott, eHow Contributor  says to: “replace your bed linens weekly and wash your clothing and bed linens with Borax in hot water that’s 98 degrees F. Sprinkle Borax over your mattress and pound it into the material. Pounding helps scatter the Borax over the material while dislodging bed bugs and debris. Use a water spray bottle filled with hot water. Spray a light mist over the entire mattress. This will trap the ornery bed bugs shaken from their slumber under the moist, suffocating Borax. Allow the wet Borax to dry, then vacuum the mattress.”

 Wikipedia® says “Borax, sodium tetraborate decahydrate, is not acutely toxic. Its LD50 (median lethal dose) score is tested at 2.66 g/kg in rats: a significant dose of the chemical is needed to cause severe symptoms or death. The lethal dose is not necessarily the same for humans. Simple exposure can cause respiratory and skin irritation; ingestion may cause gastrointestinal distress including nausea, persistent vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Effects on the vascular system and brain include headaches and lethargy, but are less frequent. “In severe poisonings, a beefy red skin rash affecting palms, soles, buttocks and scrotum has been described. With severe poisoning, erythematous and exfoliative rash, unconsciousness, respiratory depression, and renal failure.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>